Category Archives: Education

From ‘Penetrate and Patch’ to ‘Building Security In’

This year I was pleased to be named one of U. Maryland’s Distinguished Scholar-Teachers (DSTs). This recognition, awarded to a few UMD faculty each year, is given to those who have shown success both in teaching and research. I put a lot of energy into both of these activities, so it was a great feeling to be recognized as a DST.

hicks-dst-talkOne of the consequences of accepting the award is that you must give a lecture about your research/interests to a general audience. I gave my talk, titled From ‘Penetrate and Patch’ to ‘Building Security In’, on Monday.

My Department Chair, Samir Khuller, a DST himself, told me that I should aim the talk for an eighth grade level, i.e., an audience with only a cursory understanding of computer science. But of course it’s not quite that simple: only some people who attend will be at that level; many who attend will have a stronger background because they will be interested in the topic. So as I was preparing my talk last week I tried to make it so the generalists would not get lost, and the specialists would not get bored.

The point of my talk is that our cybersecurity woes are often (but not always) due to vulnerable software. While firewalls, anti-virus, and other security products stem the tide of attacks, these products are not addressing the root problem. Once software vulnerabilties are discovered they can be patched, but this “penetrate and patch” approach is not working: unpatched systems remain vulnerable, and even when they are the patched there are probably other latent vulnerabilities that remain. “Penetrate and patch” also doesn’t address the new vulnerabilities that are introduced as the software evolves.

So we need shift our mentality to building security in: We should aim to build software that is free of vulnerabilities (or far more likely to be free of them) right from the start.

640px-Building_bridges,_Fuling_Wujiang_Bridge

To get this idea across to a general audience I used bridge-building as a motivation: We use the best designs, methods, and tools to build bridges that stand up to heavy use and extreme conditions. Then I talked about what software is — basically how it works — and how some software bugs can be exploited to deleterious effect. I showed, at least at a high level, how a buffer overflow works. Then I showed how language design and other PL-style research products are analogous to the best tools and methods of bridge-building, and can therefore help us avoid buffer overflows and other problems. I also described how — through my coursera software security class and the build-it, break-it, fix-it contest 1 — I am trying to encourage this mentality of building secure software from the start, not just leaving security to the last.

I am pretty pleased with how it turned out. Because of having to account for a broad audience, I spent a lot of time on the talk — probably as much as I did on my tenure/promotion talk! My in-laws were in attendance and they told me they understood things pretty well, and that the talk put the trajectory of recent security breaches in perspective.

A link to a video of the talk and slides is here (the proper talk starts at about the 3-minute mark):

https://www.cs.umd.edu/event/2015/09/penetrate-and-patch-building-security

The audio isn’t great, and the slides are a little hard to see (but there’s a link to the PDF), but I think it’s watchable. I’d be very curious for your feedback. I hope you will share the link with friends, tech-savvy or not, who might wonder what this cybersecurity stuff is all about, and how PL research and methods can play a important role in addressing it.

Notes:

  1. The next iteration of the contest starts Thursday, October 1 — not too late to sign up!

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Teaching and Researching Programming Languages at a Liberal Arts College

During my tenure as a student and professor, I have been to many talks offering career advice to graduate students. Most of these talks focus on careers in research universities and industrial research labs, and leave out discussion of institutions, such as liberal arts colleges, that are primarily concerned with undergraduate education. This is unfortunate because many liberal arts colleges are highly selective institutions that offer exciting careers that mix research and teaching, albeit in a different way than careers in research universities.

One way to reduce the information deficit about liberal arts colleges is to report on the experiences of those who work at one. This is what we do in the present post. Specifically, I interview Steve Freund, who is a professor of computer science at Williams College, ranked by US News as the top liberal arts college in America. Steve is a highly successful PL researcher, known for his significant contributions to the analysis of concurrent programs. As a result, he is in a great position to give PL Enthusiast readers a view into what it’s like to be a teacher and researcher at a liberal arts institution. Continue reading

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Built, Broken, Fixed: BIBIFI Security Contest Report

Earlier in the summer I discussed a security-oriented programming contest we were planning to run called Build-it, Break-it, Fix-it (BIBIFI). The contest completed about a week ago, and the winners are now posted on the contest site, https://builditbreakit.org.

Here I present a preliminary report of how the contest went. In short: well!

We had nearly a dozen qualifying submissions out of 20 or so teams that made an attempt, and these submissions used a variety of languages — the winners programmed in Python and Haskell, and other submissions were in C/C++, Go, and Java (with one non-qualifying submission in Ruby). Scoring was based on security, correctness, and performance (as in the real world!) and in the end the first two mattered most: teams found many bugs in qualifying submissions, and at least one team was scoring near the top until other teams found their program did not pay much attention to security.

We have much data analysis still to do, to understand more about what happened and why. If you have scientific questions you think we should investigate, after reading this report, I’d love to know them. In the end, I think the contest made a successful go at emphasizing security is not just about breaking things, but also about building them correctly.

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Bridging Algorithms and Programming Languages

In the computing stack, PL sits between algorithms and systems. Without algorithms to implement or computer systems to run them on, there would be no need for programming languages. However, the research communities that study algorithms, PL, and systems don’t really have much of an overlap. This is perhaps unavoidable: computer science is now a mature field, and researchers in mature fields tend to pursue specialized and technical research questions.

At the same time, it seems important that the approaches — assumptions and methods — of different subfields of computing be compatible to some extent. At the end of the day, computer science aims to produce solutions for the whole computing stack. An “impedence mismatch” between its subfields compromises our ability to come up with such end-to-end solutions.

This suggests that the comparative study of assumptions, techniques and cultures of different CS fields (a sort of “comp lit” for computer science) is potentially valuable.

Personally, I have always been intrigued by the relationship between the fields of programming languages and algorithms. In this post, I discuss similarities and differences between these two areas, and argue that their synthesis could be interesting for both research and teaching.

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Who teaches functional programming?

A couple of months ago, we posted about the research program of SocioPLT, whose goal is to study why some languages get adopted more than others. As part of a study, the investigators ranked languages according to their frequency of use in Sourceforge projects during the period 2000-2010. An interesting finding was that among the top 20 languages in these rankings, there wasn’t even one functional language.

Academic PL researchers tend to love functional programming, so many of us would find this fact depressing. However, it seems that we academics are at least partly to blame for this state of affairs. For functional programming to be embraced in the “real world”, universities must teach it. In this post, I show that few universities do. In particular, functional programming is a significant part of the core programming sequence at only 9 of the top 33 American schools, and is not offered at all in about 40% of these schools.  Continue reading

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Program verification in the undergraduate CS curriculum (Part II)

[This is the second part of a two-post series. The first part is here.]

Recently, I talked about using program verifiers in teaching proof techniques in undergraduate CS, and my own experience with using the Dafny verifier in an algorithms class. One thing that that post was missing was a student perspective. So I asked three of my students — Julie Eisenberg, Rebecca Smith, and Matthew Dunn-Rankin — what they thought of Dafny. In this post, I summarize their insightful feedback and ponder about its implications.

The takeaway message for me is that verification tools such as Dafny are an excellent way of introducing students to formal proofs. At the same time, some care is needed as we integrate these tools with our pedagogy. In particular, the automated reasoning capabilities of Dafny aren’t an unadulterated blessing, and we must make sure that students understand how to do formal proofs fully manually. We ought to also invest more effort on tools that make the proof process more productive, for example by giving users more feedback on why an attempt at a formal proof failed.  Continue reading

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Program verification in the undergraduate CS curriculum

[This is the first part of a two-post series. The second part is here.]

In previous posts on this blog, I have talked about how research on programming languages and tools can contribute to K-16 education. In this post, I will share with you some of my experiences while trying to use a PL tool — specifically, a semi-automated program verifier — in an undergraduate algorithms class. The experience was a success in many ways. A program verifier gives students a hands-on understanding of how algorithms are mathematical objects, and verification tools are now mature enough for productive classroom use. I think every CS program would benefit students by introducing them to these tools at some point. At the same time, the experience exposed me to some serious limitations of current-day program verification, and opened up a number of directions for new research in this area. Continue reading

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Programming language research for K-16 education (Part II)

In this post, I’ll continue our ongoing discussion of applications of PL research in computer-assisted education. Specifically, I’ll summarize a talk that Loris D’Antoni of Penn gave at this year’s Workshop on Programming Language Technology for Massive Open Online Courses (PLOOC). I was intrigued by this work, and I think a lot of you may be too.

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Programming language research for K-16 education

At the recent PLDI conference, Armando Solar-Lezama and I organized a workshop called PLOOC: “Programming Language Tools for Massive Open Online Courses.” The high-level goal of the workshop was to discuss ways in which tools coming out of PL research can be used in K-16 education. Over the years, PL researchers have developed many techniques for automating and simplifying the design and analysis of programs. For the most part, these techniques have targeted the professional programmer. However, techniques developed for industrial code can also be applied to student-written programs in computer science courses.

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