Category Archives: Software engineering

Rise of the Robots: Review and Reflection

I recently read Martin Ford’s Rise of the Robots with the UMD CS faculty book club. The book considers the impact of the growth of information technology (IT) on the human labor market, and how the trend towards greater automation could eventually eliminate a substantial number of jobs. The result could be a radical, and disruptive, reshaping of the global economy.81fncUPB6cL

I would recommend the book. I found it well-written and thought provoking. Ford capably argues from past economic and technology trends and also digs into particular problems, products, and research in order to extrapolate future impact. Of the ten faculty who discussed the book, nine of us (including me) were convinced that future automation will be increasingly disruptive to human labor markets.

While reading the book, I found myself wondering about my own role, and that of my field, in addressing this situation we’ve contributed to. Many computer scientists have high-minded ideals and wish to help society through IT innovation. What can we do to ensure that those ideals are realized, rather than perverted into the dystopian future that Ford is warning us about? Continue reading

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Filed under Algorithms, Book Reviews, Policy, Software engineering

What is a bug?

Buggy software doesn’t work. According to wikipedia

A software bug is an error … in a computer program or system that causes it to produce an incorrect or unexpected result, or to behave in unintended ways. Most bugs arise from mistakes and errors made by people in either a program’s source code or its design ...

When something is wrong with a program, we rarely hear of it having one bug — we hear of it having many bugs. I’m wondering: Where does one bug end and the next bug begin?

To answer this question, we need an operational definition of a bug, not the indirect notion present in the Wikipedia quote. 1

This post starts to explore such a definition, but I’m not satisfied with it yet — I’m hoping you will provide your thoughts in the comments to move it forward.

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Notes:

  1. Andreas Zeller, in his book Why Programs Fail, prefers the term defect to bug since the latter term is sometimes used to refer to erroneous behavior, rather than erroneous code. I stick with the term bug, in this post, and use it to mean the problematic code (only).

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Filed under Semantics, Software engineering