Tag Archives: noninterference

PRNG entropy loss and noninterference

I just got back from CCS (ACM’s conference on Computer and Communications Security) in Vienna, Austria. I really enjoyed the conference and the city.

At the conference we presented our Build it, Break it, Fix it paper. In the same session was the presentation on a really interesting paper called Practical Detection of Entropy Loss in Pseudo-Random Number Generators, by Felix Dörre and Vladimir Klebanov. 1 This paper presents a program analysis that aims to find entropy-compromising flaws in PRNG implementations; such flaws could make the PRNG’s outputs more predictable (“entropy” is basically a synonym for “uncertainty”). When a PRNG is used to generate secrets like encryption keys, less entropy means those secrets can be more easily guessed by an attacker.

A PRNG can be viewed as a deterministic function from an actually-random seed to a pseudo-random output. The key insight of the work is that this function should not “lose entropy” — i.e., its outputs should contain all of the randomness present in its seed. Another way of saying this is that the PRNG must be injective. The injectivity of a function can be checked by an automatic program analysis.

Using the tool they developed, the paper’s authors were able to find known bugs, and an important unknown bug in libgcrypt’s PRNG. Their approach was essentially a variation of prior work checking noninterference; I found the connection to this property surprising and insightful. As discussed in a prior post, security properties can often be challenging to state and verify; in this case the property is pleasingingly simple to state and practical to verify.

Both injectivity and noninterference are examples of K-safety properties, which involve relations between multiple (i.e., K) program executions. New technology to check such properties is being actively researched, e.g., in DARPA’s STAC program. This paper is another example of the utility of that general thrust of work, and of using programming languages techniques (automated program analysis) for proving security properties.

Continue reading

Notes:

  1. You can download the paper for free from the conference’s OpenTOC.

5 Comments

Filed under Program Analysis, Software Security

Expressing Security Policies

[This blog post was conceived by Steve Chong, at Harvard, and co-authored with Michael Hicks.]

Enforcing information security is increasingly important as more of our sensitive data is managed by computer systems. We would like our medical records, personal financial information, social network data, etc. to be “private,” which is to say we don’t want the wrong people looking at it. But while we might have an intuitive idea about who the “wrong people” are, if we are to build computer systems that enforce the confidentiality of our private information, we have to turn this intuition into an actionable policy.

Defining what exactly it means to “handle private information correctly” can be subtle and tricky. This is where programming language techniques can help us, by providing formal semantic models of computer systems within which we can define security policies for private information. That is, we can use formal semantics to precisely characterize what it means for a computer system to handle information in accordance with the security policies associated with sensitive information. Defining security policies is still a difficult task, but using formal semantics allows us to give security policies an unambiguous interpretation and to explicate the subtleties involved in “handling private information correctly.”

In this blog post, we’ll focus on the intuition behind some security policies for private information. We won’t dig deeply into formal semantics for policies, but we provide links to relevant technical papers at the end of the post. Later, we also briefly mention how PL techniques can help enforce policies of the sort we discuss here.

Continue reading

9 Comments

Filed under Semantics, Software Security

What is noninterference, and how do we enforce it?

In this post I discuss a program security property called noninterference. I motivate why you might like it if your program satisfied noninterference, and show that the property is fundamental to many areas beyond just security. I also explore some programming languages and tools that might help you enforce noninterference, noting that while tainting analysis won’t get you the whole way there, research tools that attempt to do better have their own problems. I conclude with some suggestions for future research, in particular with the idea that testing noninterference may be a practical approach.

Continue reading

6 Comments

Filed under Program Analysis, Software Security, Types